Visitor information
Opening hours
How to find us
Parking & prices
Contact details

Opening hours

Gates open at 8am and close at 6pm (please check on site signs for exact times).

How to find us

How to find us
Creech Wood, Denmead, Waterlooville
Sat Nav Postcode: PO7 6UB
By Car

Head south-west from Denmead on the Bunkers Hill road towards Southwick. The car park is on the left hand side.

OS Grid Ref
SU647113

50.896915986483, -1.0790634155273

Parking and prices

The car park for Creech Wood is at Bunkers Hill. 

There are no parking charges at Creech Wood. 

Additional information

Number of accessible parking spaces: 0

There are no designated accessible parking spaces at this forest, have you seen our Easy Access trails page?

Contact details

A mosaic of woodland, historic interest and peaceful walks, come and explore Creech Wood

Located west of Waterlooville within the stunning South Downs landscape, Creech Wood is home to some impressive conifers as well as a small number of ancient broad-leaved trees. The mixture of old and young trees provides a variety of habitats for wildlife, including patches of heather favoured by butterflies and bees, so bring your binoculars!

Discover Creech Wood's historic past as one of the few remaining areas of the medieval Forest of Bere. It was also made into a Royal Forest by the Normans, where the king could hunt within the grounds. 

At a glance

  • Walking 

  • Horse riding 

Things to do

Creech Wood offers a network of bridleways winding their way through a diverse and beautiful range of habitats.

Horse riding is by permit only and is informal, there is no marked route. Riders may use any track that they feel is suitable for the ability of their horse and themselves. It is recommended that riders new to the forest take the map supplied with the permit when entering the forest. Surfaces can be muddy in the winter. Carriage driving is possible with permission.

Horse riding requires a permit which can be purchased through TROT. 

Wide grassy rides provide a network of walks throughout this forest, but please note there are no waymarkers or maps and routes can get muddy in winter. Deer can occasionally be spotted at early morning or dusk so dog-walkers please be aware.

Nearby forests

woodland trail in picturesque setting

With walking trails, cycling, outdoor play and picnic spots, West Walk is the ideal family day out. At 350 hectares, it is the largest remaining fragment of the ancient Forest of Bere. 

Mossy woodland path

Popular with locals and visitors alike, Woodend is one of the few remaining fragments that make up the ancient Forest of Bere.

The shaded paths provide an excellent spot for walking and exploring or you can relax within the trees and listen to the sounds of nature. From ponds and streams with great crested newts and butterflies, there are a variety of habitats to enjoy.

Recoup at the nearby West Walk for a light refreshment and a host of facilities.

Spring in the forest

Come and enjoy the beautiful surroundings of Upperford Copse, part of one of the remaining fragments which make up the ancient Forest of Bere. 

Woman and dog looking out over field

Forestry update

Over many decades some of the areas of Havant Thicket have been planted with non-native conifer trees to provide timber for the nation. Forestry England’s contractors will be working in the area until 19 February, removing the some of the conifer trees to start the journey of restoring this area to a broadleaf woodland.

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