Croydon Hill

Visitor information

Bird watching, forest trails and panoramic views make Croydon Hill an outdoor adventure not to be missed

Found in the Brendon Hills of Exmoor National Park, just north of the small village of Luxborough, Croydon Hill provides the perfect backdrop for you to enjoy the tranquility of Somerset. 

Known locally as a great spot for bird watching, make sure you bring your binoculars and camera to capture the local wildlife! 

At a glance

  • Walking 
  • Dogs welcome 

Things to do

Walking is the perfect way to get some fresh air. Hike the hills of Croydon Hill to be rewarded with breathtaking views of the surrounding landscape.

Or visit the nearby Nutcombe Bottom to wander the Tall Trees Trail and see the tallest tree in England, a 60.05m (197ft) high Douglas fir.

Nearby forests

Conifer canopy generic

Nutcombe Bottom is a popular walking and picnic site near Dunster.

Nutcombe Bottom is home to England’s tallest tree, which has been growing here since 1876 and was 60.05 metres when it was last measured in 2009. It also has a trunk estimated to weigh 50 tonnes with a diameter of 1.74 metres.

Aerial view of Bearland Chimney at Chargot Wood

Located in Exmoor National Park just a short drive from Taunton, Chargot Wood is a beautiful coniferous woodland that provides a tranquil environment and an exciting range of wildlife.

Chargot is also a hub for the West Somerset Mineral Line with a variety of fascinating industrial heritage to explore.

Somerset hill

A mixture of broad-leaved trees and conifers, and part of the larger forest stretching right up to the coast, Kennisham Hill is a wildlife-spotter’s paradise.

Bring your binoculars and see if you can spot the Cheddar Pink flower (which can only be found in Somerset) horseshoe bat, or the wood white butterfly.

beech and oak tree

Found on the north end of the Quantock Ridge, enjoy glorious views over the Bristol Channel and across to Exmoor. This small wood is not well known by tourists making it a stunning secret get away, perfect for a quiet ride or dog walk. 

Historically, the area formed part of the Quantoxhead Estate and was planted in the late 18th Century. By 1911 the woodland supported 120 fallow and 25 red deer.

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